FWD: The War Hollow

Viking influence in the Celtic lands goes back to the very beginning of the Viking Age, when bold and brave men from Scandinavia decided to make the perilous journey across the seas to take what treasures they could from the British Isles. One of the boldest of these Viking raiders was Magnus Olaffson (Magnús Óláfsson), […]

via ‘The War Hollow’ — Stair na hÉireann – History of Ireland

Fwd: Triple Goddesses — Stair na hÉireann – History of Ireland

In religious iconography or mythological art, three separate beings may represent either a triad who always appear as a group or a single deity known from literary sources as having three aspects. In the case of the Irish Brigid it can be ambiguous whether she is a single goddess or three sisters, all named Brigid. […]

via Triple Goddesses — Stair na hÉireann – History of Ireland

Fwd: History of Ireland

Irish society, up through the Iron Age, was based on the family unit. The family traditionally consisted of living parents and their children. The next larger unit came to be known as the Sept, which consisted of a closely related group of families such as the families of children of one set of parents and […]

via Brehon Law: Clans and Social Classes — Stair na hÉireann – History of Ireland

988 – The Norse King Glúniairn recognises Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, High King of Ireland, and agrees to pay taxes and accept Brehon Law; the event is considered to be the founding of the city of Dublin. — Stair na hÉireann – History of Ireland

The earliest reference to Dublin is sometimes said to be found in the writings of Claudius Ptolemaeus (Ptolemy), the Egyptian-Greek astronomer and cartographer, around the year 140, who refers to a settlement called Eblana. This would seem to give Dublin a just claim to nearly two thousand years of antiquity, as the settlement must have […]

via 988 – The Norse King Glúniairn recognises Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, High King of Ireland, and agrees to pay taxes and accept Brehon Law; the event is considered to be the founding of the city of Dublin. — Stair na hÉireann – History of Ireland

Ireland 2014 – Part VI

Dublin

Today was our ‘day off’ from each other, so I spent a few hours in Dublin on my own.

Dalkey

I was invited to visit Dalkey, a beautiful little village not too far away from Dublin. Thanks to Eileen I spent a lovely afternoon in Dalkey before I headed back to Dublin for dinner in the evening.

Our last day in Dublin

On our last day we went for a walk along the Liffey, to the National Museum. As we were walking down Arran Quay a seagull suddenly left its traces on my sister’s shirt. Thanks to a very kind loundrette owner we continued our walk along the river and spent a nice afternoon at the museum before we had to leave for the airport…

Ireland 2014 – Part V – Off to Wicklow Mountains

It was the second time I traveled to the Wicklow Mountains and Glendalough, another beautiful National Park in Ireland…

Ireland 2014 – Part IV – Off to the West Coast

Limerick, Shannon River, King John’s Castle, Bunratty Castle

We got up very early, had a quick coffee and got ready for our first day tour, which started at 6.50 am. Imagine how excited we all were. The Cliffs of Moher, one of the most famous places in Ireland.
Our first stop was Limerick and the river Shannon, greeted by King John’s Castle. Back on the coach our next stop was at Bunratty Castle. It was raining nonstop, but it didn’t stop us from taking pictures.

Cliffs Of Moher

Back on the road again the landscape began to change more and more, and the closer we got to the west coast the more excited we got.
Beautiful and impressive. Majestic. The Cliffs of Moher. We could have spent hours just walking along the cliffs…

The Burren

After our lunch stop in the village of Doolin our coach took us to one of Ireland’s greatest National Parks, the Burren. Another beautiful place along Ireland’s West Coast.

Corcomroe Abbey

Our next stop was Corcomroe Abbey, built in the 12th century on an old pagan site.

Galway Bay / Dunguaire Castle

As our coach took us along the coastline to the seaside village of Kinvara it didn’t take long and we reached one of the most impressive castle in Ireland, Dunguaire Castle. Again I could have spent hours there…

After a long but brilliant day it was now time to make our way back to Dublin. We took the Galway road through Clarinbridge, had another coffee stop somewhere along the road and made it back to the East Coast safe and sound.