988 – The Norse King Glúniairn recognises Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, High King of Ireland, and agrees to pay taxes and accept Brehon Law; the event is considered to be the founding of the city of Dublin. — Stair na hÉireann – History of Ireland

The earliest reference to Dublin is sometimes said to be found in the writings of Claudius Ptolemaeus (Ptolemy), the Egyptian-Greek astronomer and cartographer, around the year 140, who refers to a settlement called Eblana. This would seem to give Dublin a just claim to nearly two thousand years of antiquity, as the settlement must have […]

via 988 – The Norse King Glúniairn recognises Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, High King of Ireland, and agrees to pay taxes and accept Brehon Law; the event is considered to be the founding of the city of Dublin. — Stair na hÉireann – History of Ireland

Ireland 2014 – Part VI

Dublin

Today was our ‘day off’ from each other, so I spent a few hours in Dublin on my own.

Dalkey

I was invited to visit Dalkey, a beautiful little village not too far away from Dublin. Thanks to Eileen I spent a lovely afternoon in Dalkey before I headed back to Dublin for dinner in the evening.

Our last day in Dublin

On our last day we went for a walk along the Liffey, to the National Museum. As we were walking down Arran Quay a seagull suddenly left its traces on my sister’s shirt. Thanks to a very kind loundrette owner we continued our walk along the river and spent a nice afternoon at the museum before we had to leave for the airport…

Ireland 2014 – Part III

Dublin – The next two days

Oscar Wilde, loads of rain, more colourful art work, hidden alleys and Dublin Castle.

Molly Malone

When I led my sister and friend to the Molly Malone statue I couldn’t believe my eyes cause she was no longer there. Turning around several times I said, “she was here, I swear, she was here!” A moment later we were told that she’s in a pub getting drunk. – A joke? Not really. A shop owner told us that she had been removed due to a makeover, in a pub. Someone should have told me!

Molly Malone

Ireland 2014 – Part II

Saint Patrick’s Cathedral Dublin

On our third day we got to visit St. Patrick’s Cathedral. The last time I wanted to go inside it was closed for reasons I can’t remember.

“Saint Patrick is said to have baptised converts to Christianity at a well that once existed in the park alongside the Cathedral. Because of this association with Saint Patrick, a church has stood here since the fifth century. The Normans built a church in stone on this site in 1191. This was rebuilt in the early thirteenth century and is the building we see today. Archbishop Minot rebuilt the west tower in 1370 after a fire. The spire was added in 1749.” (Current brochure of Saint Patrick’s Cathedral Dublin, 2014)

I was excited to go inside and so we did…

Ireland 2014 – Part I

The first two days

So right after we arrived in Dublin we settled into our three-bedroom, which was quite an adventure. Three different characters in a small room with an even smaller bathroom. Not to mention the hotel labyrinth. Luckily it only took us the first two days or so until we were able to find back to the reception and to the breakfast room without using a hotel map. But if you ever plan on staying as close to the Temple Bar as possible, the Street Fleet Hotel is definitely the right accomodation. The hotel staff is very friendly and always willing to help you as good as possible.

Dublin

Beautiful and busy as always. This time I got to see some of the more hidden places in Dublin. We even made it to St. Stephen’s Green and the shopping center. And since it was the first time my sister and my friend visited Ireland/Dublin I had to take them to Trinity College, The Book of Kells and the Long Room.

Of course we had to visit some of the pubs in Temple Bar even though I knew most of them were all set up to welcome tourists from all over the world…